Paradigmes d'un poulpe ocellé

kanaya-in-the-tardis:

deranged-baby:

OMFG THE BROWN ONE HAS ANGRY EYEBROWS

"Yes this is my deer friend. Deer friend is pretty like snow. You hurt deer friend I will hurt you."

somewhereineverland:

having social anxiety is bad because you cant have any relationships with anyone without spending all of your time consumed with thoughts like “they all hate me, they all laugh at me, they all think i’m annoying, everyone hates me and they don’t care about me at all”

so don’t fucking go around acting like having anxiety in social situations is cool because its not and it fucking sucks 

recoverydoesntgetadayoff:

Telling a depressed person to be happy is like telling someone who is choking to breathe. The presence of air is not the issue.

zeramato:

Students who still have a lot ahead of them. Students like me, who still have dreams, goals, and students who still aim for achievements. But because of this tragedy, it all faded away. 

I bow and salute to the brave students who saved the lives of others and sacrificed themselves. They are heroes. They are people who deserves a lot better than awards. They deserve to be in Heaven, a place full of happiness and there will be no more sufferings. I also pray for the lives of the family and the people involved in this accident and specially the souls of these heroes.

I hope that the students who were saved by these mighty students will live their lives to the fullest, achieve their dreams and goals and love their family more. I also wish that they will live being inspired by the heroes who saved their lives. Please do so.

And for the captain, my middle finger salutes you. Live well. In guilt. Thank you.

#PrayForSouthKorea

pre-raphaelisme:

Portrait of Fanny Holman Hunt by William Holman Hunt, 1866-1867.

pre-raphaelisme:

Portrait of Fanny Holman Hunt by William Holman Hunt, 1866-1867.

thegestianpoet:

Cornelis van Spaendonck, Still Life of Flowers, 1793. Oil on canvas. 

Cornelis van Spaendonck was born in the Dutch city of Tilburg, but by the age of seventeen he had followed his older brother Gerardus, also a gifted still life artist, to Paris, where they both enjoyed long and successful careers. Cornelis, for example, was director of the great Sèvres porcelain works.
Although Spaendonck’s work is removed in time by more than a century from the height of flower painting initiated by painters like Ambrosius Bosschaert the Elder and Roelant Saverij during the so-called golden age, it shares with the work of these early artists a great technical virtuosity, finish, and sensitivity to lighting in its depiction of a lush cornucopia of flowers that spill over the canvas. Given the later date of Spaendonck’s work, it is generally agreed among scholars that less meaning should be read into the presence and placement of individual flowers, and felt that viewers should merely experience the enjoyment of nature’s generosity and the artist’s skill. Still, it does not seem possible to entirely discount the symbolism of sleep, death, and rebirth in the respective presentation of poppies, lilacs, and morning glories here; along with these, the mindfulness urged by the forget-me-nots at the very center of the composition may assert a commemorative function for this picture. Or, perhaps Spaendonck intended a clever to the tale of the goddess Demeter from classical mythology (whose flower is the poppy) whose loss of her daughter Persephone to Hades, lord of the underworld, for half of each year, was the ancient explanation for the cyclical death and renewal of the natural world in the four seasons.
via the Johnson Museum of Art

thegestianpoet:

Cornelis van Spaendonck, Still Life of Flowers, 1793. Oil on canvas. 

Cornelis van Spaendonck was born in the Dutch city of Tilburg, but by the age of seventeen he had followed his older brother Gerardus, also a gifted still life artist, to Paris, where they both enjoyed long and successful careers. Cornelis, for example, was director of the great Sèvres porcelain works.

Although Spaendonck’s work is removed in time by more than a century from the height of flower painting initiated by painters like Ambrosius Bosschaert the Elder and Roelant Saverij during the so-called golden age, it shares with the work of these early artists a great technical virtuosity, finish, and sensitivity to lighting in its depiction of a lush cornucopia of flowers that spill over the canvas. Given the later date of Spaendonck’s work, it is generally agreed among scholars that less meaning should be read into the presence and placement of individual flowers, and felt that viewers should merely experience the enjoyment of nature’s generosity and the artist’s skill. Still, it does not seem possible to entirely discount the symbolism of sleep, death, and rebirth in the respective presentation of poppies, lilacs, and morning glories here; along with these, the mindfulness urged by the forget-me-nots at the very center of the composition may assert a commemorative function for this picture. Or, perhaps Spaendonck intended a clever to the tale of the goddess Demeter from classical mythology (whose flower is the poppy) whose loss of her daughter Persephone to Hades, lord of the underworld, for half of each year, was the ancient explanation for the cyclical death and renewal of the natural world in the four seasons.

via the Johnson Museum of Art

stormtrooperfashion:

Kolfinna Kristófersdóttir in “Showgirl Fashion” by Yuval Hen for How To Spend It, 3 April 2014

stormtrooperfashion:

Kolfinna Kristófersdóttir in “Showgirl Fashion” by Yuval Hen for How To Spend It, 3 April 2014

nnmprv:

mæt (full) by Per Johansen.

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